COVID-19 SBA Resources for Child Care Providers

LISC is now accepting Paycheck Protection Program applications for MWBEs, VBEs and nonprofits in Rhode Island. Read more here. 

Note: June 2020 Update on the Paycheck Protection Program below.


During this challenging time, many child care providers are in need of additional financial resources and supports due to COVID-19 related closures and loss of income. That’s why we wanted to share some information regarding new federal programs that offer providers the opportunity to receive funding through the Small Business Administration (SBA). These programs include:

  • Paycheck Protection Program (PPP)
  • Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) and EIDL grants
  • Express Bridge Loans Pilot Program

Paycheck Protection Program (PPP)

The federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) is an emergency “forgivable loan” program. That means that employers who borrow through the PPP are eligible to have a portion, or even all, of the loan forgiven assuming that they adhere to program regulations. Essentially, the PPP allows employers to borrow up to 2.5 times their average monthly payroll costs.

June 2020 Update: The Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act of 2020 (H.R. 7010), legislation to make changes to the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) which provides forgivable loans to help small businesses make their payrolls during the COVID-19 crisis, has been signed into law.

This new provision gives businesses more time to use PPP loans by extending the eight-week period in which they must use the money to qualify for loan forgiveness to 24 weeks or December 31st, whichever comes sooner. The measure also includes:

  • Reducing the 75 percent payroll ratio requirement to 60 percent;
  • Changing the 2-year loan repayment restriction for future borrowers to 5 years;
  • Allowing payroll tax deferment for PPP recipients; and
  • Extending the June 30th rehiring deadline to the end of the year.

The proceeds of a PPP loan can be used for the following activities:

  • Payroll costs for employees including healthcare and retirement costs
  • Rent payments
  • Mortgage interest payments (but not mortgage prepayments or principal
    payments)
  • Interest payments on other debt incurred before February 15, 2020
  • Utility payments

For the most current Payroll Protection updates, please check the Small Business Administration’s website. For recovery information in languages other than english, click here.

If you decide to pursue a PPP loan you will need to find a participating lender to speak with. We recommend you check with your financial institute first, but if they are not currently providing this service you can search for the nearest SBA approved PPP lender by entering your zip code here: https://www.sba.gov/paycheckprotection/find

If you have received a PPP loan:

Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL)

Alongside the Paycheck Protection Program, the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) is a possible way to help cover certain costs during this challenging time and you can apply now to receive this money through the SBA. You do not have to talk to a banker. Fill out an online application form through the SBA. Click here to access the application form.

Here are some key facts about this loan from the NAEYC’s fact sheet for child care providers:

  • The EIDL is a low-interest loan directly administered by the SBA for up to $2 million per business that can be extended for up to 30 years. Please note that high demand may mean that loans are approved at significantly lower amounts than $2 million.
  • The business must intend to use the loan for existing expenses that are otherwise difficult to pay at this time. While you can use it for payroll, it is a particularly good option if your business has debts outside of payroll that you need help covering.
  • As part of applying for the EIDL, your business may be able to receive up to a $10,000 advance to help you cover expenses within a few days; even if you don’t get the EIDL, you will still get to keep the advance up to $10,000 as a grant.
  • Except for the up to $10,000 advance, which is expected to be treated as a grant, the EIDL cannot be forgiven, unlike the Payment Protection Program (PPP) loan. You will have to pay the EIDL back, with interest.

Read the rest of the NAEYC’s info sheet on EIDL for child care providers here: https://www.naeyc.org/sites/default/files/globally-shared/downloads/PDFs/resources/topics/naeyc_eidl_for_child_care.pdf

If you need help in filling out this application form, we recommend reaching out to the SBA at 1-800-659-2955 or email disastercustomerservice@sba.gov. Whether you fill out the online application form or contact the SBA by phone or email, you may have to wait a while for your application to be processed during this crisis. We know this can be frustrating, but it will require patience.

SBA Express Bridge Loans Pilot Program

These loans allow small businesses who currently have a business relationship with an SBA Express Lender to access up to $25,000 quickly. They can provide vital economic support to small businesses to help overcome the temporary loss of revenue they are experiencing and can be a term loan or used to bridge the gap while applying for a direct SBA Economic Injury Disaster loan.

If your business has an urgent need for cash while waiting for decision and disbursement on an Economic Injury Disaster Loan, it may qualify for an SBA Express Disaster Bridge Loan: Express Bridge Loan Pilot Program


The NAEYC’s webinar which includes information on these programs, Paying Yourself, Your Staff, and Your Bills: Helping Child Care Programs Understand and Navigate SBA Loan Options, has been recorded and can be found here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/recording/5780694883809473292

We hope this information is helpful; however, we understand this can be a challenging and frustrating time, so please reach out to the LISC Child Care Facilities Fund team at riccelff@lisc.org if you have any questions at all.

Please note that the information provided here may change subject to additional legislation and/or guidance from Congress and the SBA. This article is for informational purposes only and should not be considered legal advice.

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